Wednesday, 20 July 2016

Discovering Singleton Beach and Thrombolites

Growing up in the amazing town of Singleton NSW, I was fully aware another Singleton existed on the western side of the continent. Often when auto-filling digital documents I'd be asked if I lived in 2330 or 6175. I never quite knew about this mysterious western place with the same name as my hometown, but while exploring WA, I figured it was my duty to check out the Singo of the west. 
First things first, this Singleton has a beach! I wouldn't go as far as to say it was the best beach I've ever been to, but it is by far the best Singleton Beach ever! You even have the option of going one way with your dog, or the other without your dog! This is sensational news for both people with and without dogs. Just be sure to look out for those snakes! Following the shoreline south of the beach you can make out the town of Mandurah, the second largest city in WA.The WA Singleton isn't quite as large as the NSW location, it is actually a suburb of Rockingham, despite being closer to Mandurah.
Any adventure to Singleton WA wouldn't be complete without a quick trip to the general store. I was really keen to get myself a stubby holder or postcard as a souvenir of my expedition, sadly however nothing was available. I would have thought many Singletonians would be making the spiritual journey from Singleton to Singleton, but alas, not enough to make Singleton based souvenirs the next big thing.

We didn't have the time on this trip to fully explore Mandurah, however on a whim we ended up at Lake Clifton within the Yalgorup National Park. What marks this place on the map are the Thrombolites. Thrombolites are these weird rock looking things, which are actually microbial communities, about 2000 years old, that photosynthesize. They are the ancestors of the origin of oxygen and are only found in very few locations in the modern world. There's a nice little jetty that gives you a good view of these Thrombolites, they also look amazing in the late afternoon sun!